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This FM radio-controlled anti- theft alarm can be used with any vehicle having 6- to 12-volt DC supply system. The mini VHF, FM transmitter is fitted in the vehicle at night when it is parked in the car porch or car park. The receiver unit with CXA1019, a single IC-based FM radio module, which is freely available in the market at reasonable rate, is kept inside. Receiver is tuned to the transmitter's frequency. When the transmitter is on and the signals are being received by FM radio receiver, no hissing noise is available at the output of receiver.

Thus transistor T2 (BC548) does not conduct. This results in the relay driver transistor T3 getting its forward base bias via 10k resistor R5 and the relay gets energised. When an intruder tries to drive the car and takes it a few metres away from the car porch, the radio link between the car (transmitter) and alarm (receiver) is broken. As a result FM radio module gene-rates hissing noise. Hissing AC signals are coupled to relay switching circ- uit via audio transformer. These AC signals are rectified and filtered by diode D1 and capacitor C8, and the resulting positive DC voltage provides a forward bias to transistor T2. Thus transistor T2 conducts, and it pulls the base of relay driver transistor T3 to ground level. The relay thus gets de-activated and the alarm connected via N/C contacts of relay is switched on. If, by chance, the intruder finds out about the wireless alarm and disconnects the transmitter from battery, still remote alarm remains activated because in the absence of signal, the receiver continues to produce hissing noise at its output. So the burglar alarm is fool-proof and highly reliable.
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Brakelight Flasher



This is basically a flasher circuit modified to turn on and off a bulb instead of a LED. It uses a 555 timer IC working as an astable multivibrator. The flashing rate can be varied from very fast to a maximum of once in 1.5 sec by varying the preset VR1.
The ON time of the circuit is given by:
TON= 0.69xC1x(R1 + VR1) second

and the OFF time is:
TOFF= 0.69xC1xVR1 second

You can increase the value of C1 to 100uF to get a slower flashing rate of upto once in 10 sec.
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4 in 1 Burglar Alarm

In this circuit, the alarm will be switched on under the following four different conditions: 1. When light falls on LDR1 (at the entry to the premises). 2. When light falling on LDR2 is obstructed. 3. When door switches are opened or a wire is broken. 4. When a handle is touched. The light dependent resistor LDR1 should be placed in darkness near the door lock or handle etc. If an intruder flashes his torch, its light will fall on LDR1,




reducing the voltage drop across it and so also the voltage applied to trigger 1 (pin 6) of IC1. Thus transistor T2 will get forward biased and relay RL1 energise and operate the alarm. Sensitivity of LDR1 can be adjusted by varying preset VR1. LDR2 may be placed on one side of a corridor such that the beam of light from a light source always falls on it. When an intruder passes through the corridor, his shadow falls on LDR2. As a result voltage drop across LDR2 increases and pin 8 of IC1 goes low while output pin 9 of IC1 goes high. Transistor T2 gets switched on and the relay operates to set the alarm. The sensitivity of LDR2 can be adjusted by varying potentiometer VR2. A long but very thin wire may be connected between the points A and B or C and D across a window or a door. This long wire may even be used to lock or tie something. If anyone cuts or breaks this wire, the alarm will be switched on as pin 8 or 6 will go low. In place of the wire between points A and B or C and D door switches can be connected. These switches should be fixed on the door in such a way that when the door is closed the switch gets closed and when the door is open the switch remains open. If the switches or wire, are not used between these points, the points should be shorted. With the help of a wire, connect the touch point (P) with the handle of a door or some other suitable object made of conducting material. When one touches this handle or the other connected object, pin 6 of IC1 goes �low�. So the alarm and the relay gets switched on. Remember that the object connected to this touch point should be well insulated from ground. For good touch action, potentiometer VR3 should be properly adjusted. If potentiometer VR3 tapping is held more towards ground, the alarm will get switched on even without touching. In such a situation, the tapping should be raised. But the tapping point should not be raised too much as the touch action would then vanish. When you vary potentiometer VR1, re-adjust the sensitivity of the touch point with the help of potentiometer VR3 properly. If the alarm has a voltage rating of other than 6V (more than 6V), or if it draws a high current (more than 150 mA), connect it through the relay points as shown by the dotted lines. As a burglar alarm, battery backup is necessary for this circuit. Note: Electric sparking in the vicinity of this circuit may cause false triggering of the circuit. To avoid this adjust potentiometer VR3 properly.
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This circuit utilising a 555 timer IC can be used as an alarm system to prevent the theft of your luggage, burglars breaking into your house etc. The alarms goes ON when a thin wire, usually as thin as a hair is broken.
The circuit is straightforward. It uses a 555 IC wired as an astable multivibrator to produce a tone of frequency of about 1kHz which gives out a shrill noise to scare away the burglar.
The wire used to set off the alarm can be made of a thin copper wire like SWG 36 or higher.
You can even use single strands of copper form a power cable.


The circuit operates on a wide range of voltages from 5V to 15V.
The speaker and the circuit could be housed inside a tin can with holes drilled on the speaker side for the sound to come out.
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AC to DC switching power adaptor circuit with maximum output power of 90W. Switching power supply is built using a high voltage power switching regulator IC MC33374 and some other additional components. The MC33374 IC is a monolithic high voltage power switching regulators that are specially designed to operate directly from a rectified AC line source, and in flyback converter applications.
The MC33374 switching power adaptor combines the required converter functions with a unique programmable state controller. At various variable AC inputs, it is capable of serving up to 6 A current at 15V output voltage. This switching power adaptor is capable of providing an output power in excess of 150W with a fixed AC input of 100V, 115V, or 230V, and in excess of 90 W with a variable AC input that ranges from 85V to 265V.


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This article was originally published (in a slightly modified form) in the QST magazine, December 1998 and January 1999, and in the Radio Amateur’s Handbook, 1999. Visit the American Radio Relay League for information on these publications, and a world of ham radio related things!

Design decisions
There are several different topologies for switchers in common use, and the first decision a designer must take is which of them to consider. Among the factors affecting the decision are the power level, the number of outputs needed, the range of input voltage to be accepted, the desired tradeoff between complexity, quality and cost, and many more. For this power supply I decided to use the half bridge forward converter design. This topology connects the power transformer to a bridge formed by two power transistors and two capacitors. It is reasonably simple, puts relatively low stress on the power transistors, and makes efficient use of the transformer’s magnetic capabilities.The second basic decision is which switching frequency to use. The present trend is to use ever higher frequencies. But by doing so it becomes more difficult to filter out the RF noise inevitably generated by the switching. So I decided to stay at a low switching frequency of only 25 kHz for the full cycle, which due to the frequency doubling effect of the rectifiers results in 50 kHz on the output filter.



For the main switching elements, bipolar transistors or MOSFETs can be used. Bipolars have lower conduction losses, while MOSFETs switch faster. As in this design I wanted to keep the RF noise at an absolute minimum, very fast switching was not desired, so I used bipolar transistors. But these tend to become too slow if the driving is heavier than necessary. So, if the transistors have to switch at varying current levels, the drive to them must also be varied. This is called proportional driving, and is used in this project.

The half bridge converter is best controlled by pulse width modulation. There are several ICs available for this exact purpose. I chose the 3524, which is very simple to use and easy to find. Any 3524 will do the job. It can be an LM3524, SG3524, etc.

This basically ends the big decisions. From now on, designing the circuit is a matter of calculating proper values for everything.
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This is Circuit LM3914 LED VU Meter. use IC LM3914 and Transistor BC109C. For Display power Music by LED
This be LED VU Meter by IC LM3914 circuit show with LED convenient for the stereo or sound all signal. This easy circuit again because use IC LM3914 show get 10 the level. Build easy because use the integrated circuit just one and the price is inexpensive. The detail is all , see in the circuit better.


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LED VU Meter by LM339



The circuit below uses two quad voltage comparators (LM339) to illuminate a series of 8 LEDs indicating volume level. Each of the 8 comparators is biased at increasing voltages set by the voltage divider so that the lower right LED comes on first when the input is about 400 millivolts or about 22 milliwatts peak in an 8 ohm system. The divider voltages are set so that each LED represents about twice the power level as the one before so the scale extends from 22 milliwatts to about 2.5 watts when all LEDs are lit.


The sensitivity can be decreased with the input control to read higher levels. I have not built or tested this circuit, so please let me know if you have problems getting it working. The power levels should be as follows:

1 LED = 22mW
2 LEDs = 42mW
3 LEDs = 90mW
4 LEDs = 175mW
5 LEDs = 320mW
6 LEDs = 650mW
7 LEDs = 1.2 Watts
8 LEDs = 2.5 watts
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The circuit, is a comparator, can measure with step of 1Volt, the voltage of battery of car. The clue of voltage become after comparison of voltage of battery, that is applied in the inverting inputs of amplifiers, with voltages of reference that are produced by a Zener D1, the value of which is such so that it present good thermic stability. With the RV1, we regulate the gradation of voltage that we want. The optical clue become from four Led.


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This circuit uses just one IC and a very few number of external components. It displays the audio level in terms of 10 LEDs. The input voltage can vary from 12V to 20V, but suggested voltage is 12V. The LM3915 is a monolithic integrated circuit that senses analog voltage levels and drives ten LEDs providing a logarithmic 3 dB/step analog display



LED current drive is regulated and programmable, eliminating the need for current limiting resistors. The IC contains an adjustable voltage reference and an accurate ten-step voltage divider. The high-impedance input buffer accepts signals down to ground and up to within 1.5V of the positive supply. Further, it needs no protection against inputs of ?35V. The input buffer drives 10 individual comparators referenced to the precision divider. Accuracy is typically better than 1 dB.
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This circuit is quite useful for displaying the states of digital lines. The two 330R resistors may need to be changed as the circuit I generally use is using a tri-colour LED(3 legs) with common cathode. Other LED’s may need more or less current.




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